Tag Archives: Mark Bittman

Turkey in Almond Mole

Not merely turkey redux, but a whole new animal. Transports you from Plymouth to Oaxaca. This is adapted from Mark Bittman and was printed in the San Francisco Chronicle a few years ago. He started with fresh turkey legs; I use my leftover turkey meat from Thanksgiving. Muy sabroso!

Turkey in Almond Mole

Course Main
Cuisine Mexican

Ingredients

  • 3 lbs turkey breast or thighs
  • 2 dried ancho chiles
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 dried red chile hot
  • 1 onion peeled and chopped
  • 1 cup almonds blanched
  • fine sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp organic ground black pepper
  • 5 cloves garlic minced, or
  • 1/2 tbsp organic minced garlic
  • 3 cups Tomatoes peeled and chopped (about 3 cups)
  • 1/2 tsp organic ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp organic ground cloves
  • 1 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1/4 cup sesame seeds as needed
  • tortillas

Instructions

  1. Soak ancho or other mild chili in hot water to cover. Once softened, remove from water and remove stems and seeds. Set aside.
  2. Heat half the oil at medium-high in heavy skillet or casserole that can later be covered. Add hot chili and onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion begins to soften, about 3-5 minutes. Add almonds, salt, pepper, garlic, tomatoes, cinnamon, cloves, mild chiles, vinegar and half the stock. Cook, stirring occasionally, until tomatoes begin to break down. Cool slightly (or for several hours) then puree in blender. Add remaining stock as needed to allow the blender to do its work. Taste, and add more salt, pepper and vinegar to taste.
  3. Shred turkey (or use whole legs), and add to mole until heated throughout.
  4. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve with tortillas.

Acorn Squash Stuffed with Quinoa, Cranberries and Swiss Chard

Since reading Food Matters by Mark Bittman, I have started to work more veggies into my diet. This tasty recipe, from The Cancer Fighting Kitchen, by Rebecca Katz, is a meal in itself. Make more than you need as it is great as a leftover.

Acorn Squash Stuffed with Quinoa, Cranberries and Swiss Chard

Course Main, Side
Cuisine Middle Eastern
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Calories 526 kcal

Ingredients

Squash

  • 4 acorn squash
  • 2 tbsp olive oil extra virgin
  • 1/4 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp organic ground allspice
  • 1/4 tsp organic ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp organic ground cinnamon
  • 1 pinch organic red pepper flakes

Filling

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 5 tsp olive oil extra virgin
  • 1 tbsp shallots finely diced
  • 3 tbsp fennel finely diced
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/2 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp organic ground coriander
  • 1/4 tsp organic ground cumin
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1/8 tsp organic red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries raisins, or cherries
  • Lemon juiced
  • 6 cups Swiss chard stemmed and chopped

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F and line a sheet pan with parchment paper.
  2. Cut the tops off the squash and scoop out the seeds. Cut the pointy ends off the squash so that they will stand up once they are stuffed.
  3. Stir the olive oil, salt, allspice, ginger, cinnamon, and red pepper flakes together in a bowl. Use a brush to spread the spice mixture over the inside of the squash. Place the squash, top side down, on the prepared pan and roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until tender. Check after 20 minutes by touching the top of the squash with your finger. If it is soft, transfer the squash from the oven and cover with foil until ready to fill them.
  4. Meanwhile, make the filling. Put the quinoa in a fine mesh sieve and rinse will under running cold water.
  5. Heat the 2 teaspoons of olive oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the shallot and fennel, and saute until soft, about 3 minutes. Stir in the cumin and coriander, then stir in the quinoa. Stir in the water and 1/4 teaspoon of sea salt, cover, and bring to a boil, the lower the heat and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes, until the quinoa has absorbed all of the liquid. Remove from heat, and fluff with a fork.
  6. While the quinoa is cooking, heat the 1 Tablepoon of olive oil in a large saute pan over medium heat, then add the garlic, red pepper flakes, and cranberries. Stir for 10 seconds, then add the kale and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Saute until the greens are tender, (about 5 minutes for kale and 3 for chard). Remove from the heat and stir in a squeeze of the lemon juice.
  7. Spoon the quinoa mixture into the squash. Top each squash with a scoop of the greens.

Recipe Notes

My Favorite Cookbooks

We are into week 7 of our condo remodel and have been eating dust for the past 4 weeks.  No stove, no oven, no dishwasher, no countertops, no sink, and thus no cooking.  And the outlook is grim … 2 more weeks of drywall dust, then 3 days to finish the floors, then finally …. Finally … the kitchen gets installed.  As a result, I have little to say on the recipe front, and probably won’t cook up anything new for another month.  To entertain myself, I’ve be reading through my three favorite cookbooks, pulling out old recipe favorites, planning on what I will cook once I have a kitchen.

My three favorite cookbooks are

  1. How to Cook Everything, by Mark Bittman – appropriately named, this cookbook covers everything from boiling an egg to preparing coq au vin.  It is more like an encyclopedia than a cookbook, and offers clear concise directions on how to cook, well … almost everything.
  2. The Soup Bible, by Debra Mayhew – Even though its 88 degrees out, I still crave soup, and The Soup Bible has a great collection of over 200 soups that use spices and herbs abundantly.  The Thai Chicken and Noodle Soup is easy to make, and packed with flavor.  I usually add vegetables to this recipe and make it a one dish meal.  Double the recipe and freeze the leftovers for an easy to prepare weekday dinner.
  3. Finally, my most recent add my favorite cookbook list – The Cancer Fighting Kitchen, by Rebecca Katz.  This cookbook is filled with nutrient dense recipes perfected by Rebecca who aside from being an amazing chef, has an MS in health and nutrition education and has spent many years working with cancer survivors.  This cookbook is a great gift for anyone you know undergoing chemotherapy, or anyone who wants to eat more healthfully.  Rebecca’s recipes rely heavily on spices and herbs for their healing powers and to season creative recipes.  Try the Mediterranean Lentil Salad, or the Healing Tea.  Both are exceptionally good.  Thanks to the healing tea, I have cut my wine and coffee consumption dramatically.  Now, I just reach for a cup of tea instead of a glass of wine.

Any of these cookbooks, married with our appropriately named “Wedding Box” makes a great wedding  or  housewarming gift.  And Rebecca’s cookbook, The Cancer Fighting Kitchen, is a great gift for anyone you know undergoing treatment for cancer.